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Smoky Now

Clothes, the Enemy of Equality in High School

Andrew Guerin, Staffer

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Some students at Smoky Hill High School go to great lengths to be popular. This often includes waking up earlier to put on trendy clothes, and then making up that sleep in class. Some kids spend hours staring at the closet trying to find just the right outfit.


However, some society’s most popular people don’t ever worry about their outfits. Mark Zuckerberg is the co-founder of the social media site Facebook, yet his popularity never came from his clothes. Zuckerberg’s fame came from his hard work making Facebook, not doing things that waste time like picking out clothes. He worked on his dream. Instead of gaining decision fatigue with minimal decisions such as clothes he wore the same thing every day, and even now he buys what’s comfortable to him instead of clothes that are expensive.


Mark Zuckerberg is a role model to many due to his accomplishments, and his choice of clothes and routine was very beneficial for him. This is why I want Smoky Hill High School to have school uniforms.


Unlike Mark Zuckerberg by not having uniforms the students disrupt their sleep schedule, seperate themselves from others by wealth, poor decision making, and the only supporting fact about having the choice of what to wear is that, “kids need to express themselves”.


Having the freedom to choose how to dress is hurting how we see each other, yet the only evidence to keep the freedom to choose how to dress it that it allows students to express themselves.


Nekell Lowe a freshman at Smoky Hill high school said, “Because having uniforms is uncalled for, people should be able to dress how they want to express themselves. Because being in highschool you get surrounded by a whole bunch of people a lot of people get influenced by a whole bunch of other people so you should express yourself and not go off of trends and other stuff like that.”


Although students being able to express themselves in their clothes by showing what they are into, their clothes indirectly show how popular they are.

Adam Migah a freshman at Smoky Hill stated, “I mean if they don’t have the expensive brands or anything they’re not like considered popular. Its kinda like a statement of oh I have money.”

Both Lowe and Migah both said that they spent twenty minutes to an hour to pick their clothes. Moreover they both wake up earlier to pick out their clothes, but picking clothes doesn’t only affect how much time you have.


Roy F. Baumeister is a psychiatrist who specializes in decision fatigue told the news site, called the New York Times. “Your ability to make the right investment or hiring decision may be reduced simply because you expended some of your willpower earlier when you held your tongue in response to someone’s offensive remark or when you exerted yourself to get to the meeting on time.”


Making a decision as little as choosing a color has the same decision fatigue as whether or not to have kids. By having a uniform the decision fatigue will be reduced drastically, and instead of students fatiguing themselves in the choice of what clothes you wear, it can be used on a answer to test which can raise your grade.


If Smoky Hill had a uniform policy student’s and their ability to express themselves via there clothes will be taken away, yet the kids who can’t afford the trendy clothes have the chance to become popular due to their personality, and students can do better in school by making the best decisions.


Learn more about decision fatigue: http://www.businessinsider.com/barack-obama-mark-zuckerberg-wear-the-same-outfit-2015-4

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Clothes, the Enemy of Equality in High School